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Last night, 28 November was CEN’s End of Year get-together where we celebrated together the achievements of this past year. We also presented the 2019 Be a Team (BAT) Awards and CEN Staff gave a brief update on their activities for the year.

The 2019 winners are:

  • Most outstanding all-rounder “BAT” Award– Gary Blaschke for his dedicated work with Disabled Surfers Association, Coal-ash Community Alliance and as a vocal spokesperson on local issues.

  • Most outstanding community based organisation– Grow Urban Shade Trees (GUST), founders Melissa Chandler, Debbie Sunartha and Jennifer Wilder for their tireless work promoting the benefits of trees and community planting events.

  • Rookie of the year– Justin Estreich, for his inspirational marine debris clean ups across the Central Coast for Sea Shepherd and bringing people together in these events.

  • Best 12thperson –Carla Roberts for her dedication and commitment to Wildlife ARC caring for injured native animals for more than 30 yearsBAT AWARDS

living Systems

The recent catastrophic fire conditions have highlighted the deep disconnect we have with nature and lack of understanding of our interdependency with this living system, of which we are a part. This ignorance at all levels of our complex societies, has detached the connection between deforestation leading to soil erosion and without the “deep root of trees to bring moisture from deep underground eventually replenishing the atmospheric moisture from our oceans, the droughts tend to be longer and drier,” as described by Charles Eisenstein in his book Climate a New Story. He describes how deforestation results in higher clouds, which produce less rainfall in total but in greater intensity, aggravating the drought/flooding cycle.

This living system also includes our wildlife, such as our Koala’s, whose interdependent relationship with native eucalyptus trees are vital for other wildlife and so any catastrophic change to their population can trigger an ecological chain reaction. That’s why we are in a critical stage in human civilisation and why more than ever, we need to protect our Coastal Open Space System (COSS) and native forests from being cleared. Also, continue to protect our biodiversity, essential for the resilience of our living system, such as Porters Creek Wetlands on the Central Coast, so it is not only protected but thriving. Join us at our monthly Sustainable Saturday’s to Protect, Reconnect and Regenerate our living human communities so dependent on a healthy ‘living system’.

Hale Adasal CEN Chair

Please make a submission - they close on Monday, 11 November, 2019. 

Biodiversity Strat image

Central Coast Council has recently exhibited a draft Biodiversity Strategy.

We note that there are many good actions in the document that staff have prepared. It is also a well presented document with lots of good information and illustrations.

Click here to access the Strategy and a Summary Document

 

However, CEN has concerns about the detail - and the devil is in the detail!

The Strategy will result in a nett loss of biodiversity, the replacement of the COSS Strategy (and loss of the term "COSS") and the "disposal" of public lands.

Some key points:

Vision:

The vision (page 10) is "to maintain a healthy, connected, and socially just community that cherishes and protects our natural landscapes, and balances social and economic needs with the protection of the environment and its irreplaceable biodiversity.

We believe that the vision for a biodiversity strategy should be focused on protecting, maintaining and improving biodiversity - and the actions should ensure that there is "no nett loss of biodiversity"

Reliance on Offsetting

The strategy relies heavily on biodiversity offsetting - that is, allowing development to destroy biodiversity and "offset" that loss by protecting biodiversity elsewhere. We acknowledge that development will happen and there will be some vegetation loss - however, a biodiversity strategy should not rely as heavily on biodiversity loss to fund protection elsewhere.

Focus on Areas under threat - rather than protecting biodiversity

The Strategy focuses too heavily on "high priority areas" - rather than protection of biodiversity more generally

Strategy seeks to get rid of the term and concept of COSS

The Strategy effectively removes the concept of COSS (Coastal Open Space System). COSS is a long-term strategy that was started by Gosford Council over 35 years ago. COSS identified land for voluntary acquisition based on a set of criteria including scenic and catchment management values. The expansion of COSS was specifically identified as an action in the Central Coast Regional Plan 2036 and also Council's own Community Strategic Plan. This strategy replaces the term and concept of COSS!

Strategy wants to work with developers - but does little to recognise the community

The Strategy identifies "engaging the development industry" as a priority - but fails to acknowledge environment and community organisations that are working to protect biodiversity. This includes CEN's Land For Wildlife Program that is coordinated on a State wide basis - as well as a range of other groups on the Central Coast.

Land Disposal Plan - a public land sell off!

The strategy includes an action to "Develop and implement a Land Disposal Plan specifically for parts of natural assets with no biodiversity or recreational value (in order to generate income for the Central Coast Conservation Fund)". This suggests a public land sell off - not only of public land - but environmental lands and open space

As a minimum, CEN is calling on Council to:

  • Change the vision to include "protect, maintain and improve biodiversity with no nett loss of biodiversity
  • include a Theme for COSS (Coastal Open Space System) - that is focused on expanding the COSS system and voluntary acquisition of lands including scenic and catchment values.
  • Council should allocate an annual amount equivalent to the previous COSS levy ($0.00003 per rateable dollar) that is held in a restricted fund towards the acquisition and management of COSS lands. The COSS committee must continue.
  • Delete the action relating to the development of a Land Disposal Strategy.
  • Establish a Biodiversity Management Advisory Committee to oversee the implementation of the Biodiversity Strategy

Please make a submission by Monday, 11 November, 2019

Send your submission by:

  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (External link)
  • Post: PO Box 21, Gosford NSW 2250 or PO Box 20, Wyong NSW 2259

Or click here to use our online submission

Nature is diverse, connected, interdependent, restorative, and regenerative which has with time generated resilient communities of species and natural wonder. Those of us who do enjoy spending time in our natural environment would recognise this quality about being human, we are aware of nature’s beauty and bounty.

Maitland Bay

Building our Youth, for the future is something as community members and leaders we should be refocusing our energies. To quote Franklin D. Roosevelt, “We cannot always build a future for our youth, but we can always build our youth for the future.” As a community campaigner over the years I have regularly attended community events and met with local community groups and organisations. It amazes me that succession planning, to include younger members of these quite successful organisations has not developed as effectively as their organisations. Succession planning and having younger members on boards being mentored by the elders of the group sharing their knowledge and supporting them to eventually succeed them, is essential for the regeneration of community organisations and groups. I am proud to be guiding the Youth (16-30 years) arm of CEN together with the experienced elders of our committee and supporting them with ongoing training, events and projects to build on their leadership and community engagement skills. The best legacy we can leave behind is a generation of leaders resilient enough to manage any future challengers they may face. Our CEN Youth in their first project will be partnering and supporting the 2019 Central Coast High Schools Competition, ‘Human Rights in an Age of Climate Change- So What’s the Action Plan?’ For more information contact us

 

Hale Adasal

CEN Chairperson

We face challenging times across the globe with global warming and climate change, these challenges also bring opportunities to develop sustainable development, that is in balance with our basic needs of clean air, water and soil to grow our foods and plant our trees. A balanced approach is needed to ensure the clean water we drink and clean air we breathe is never compromised in the name of development.

Recent State government approval of the Wallarah 2 coal mine and Federal Government’s approval of Seismic testing off the Central Coast, does just that. It risks polluting the air we breathe and the water we drink. Our freshwater sources as lakes, estuaries, underground water tables and aquafers provide our community with the clean water needed to survive. These challenging times provide an opportunity for members of our community in voicing their concerns by joining us in writing letters to local MP’s over recently approved developments that impact on our precious water catchments and clean air. Our letter drive will be held in conjunction with our monthly wild plant sales on Saturday’s the 3rd August and 7th September. Join us, in this opportunity to voice to our representatives in parliament of valuing clean air and water over any development that risks our precious human needs. One of the best legacies we can leave behind for future generations is a liveable planet and community. 

Hale Adasal

CEN Chair

 

Pile Burning a health risk

CEN belives that this is a very bad policy that will impact the health of many people with asthma as it allows burning without a permit and increases the amount of fuel by 270%.

The existing RFS/NSWFB Policy on Pile Burning does all that is needed for keeping properties clear of fuel around buildings. In areas within the Sydney Air Shed (i.e. from the Hunter to Illawarra via the Central Coast) Pile Burning should not be allowed as nearly 5 million people (roughly 450,000 of whom have asthma) are impacted by what is discretionary burning.

The asthma foundation has previously raised the issue with the NSW Government, see file:///C:/Users/CCEN/AppData/Local/Temp/wlmail-433777574/supfiles2A14595/Clean%20Air%20for%20New%20South%20Wales_Submission.pdf

In particular:

The NSW Rural Fire Service has an existing Pile Burning Standard (See: https://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0012/13323/Standards-for-Pile-Burning.pdf )which notes:

If the pile burn could be of danger to a building (at any time of the year) or the burn is during the Bush Fire Danger Period, you must have a Fire Permit issued by the RFS or Fire and Rescue NSW. This standard provides advice regarding the construction of vegetation piles in order to allow safe and efficient burning.

It appears that the CC Council has been lobbied to implement a Central Coast Council draft Pile Burning policy which is on exhibition until 19th December. The policy is a massive expansion of the scale of burning (i.e. Increases the size (diameter) of logs from 150 mm to 300 mm , an increase of 400%, Increases the bulk of Open Pile Burns from 1.5 by 2 metres to 2 metres by 4 metres an increase of 270%). It also seeks to remove the need for a permit and instead allow for self assessment and burns at any time. 

The current draft allows self assessment for:

D1           Parcels of land must be:

  • Greater than 4,000m2in area; and
    • RE2 Private Recreation, 
    • R5 Large Lot Residential, 
    • RU1 Primary Production, 
    • RU2 Rural Landscape,
    • RU5 Village or 
    • RU6 Transition under the Local Environment Plan.
      • Self assessment means nothing.

bonfire2 webThe draft policy has excluded self-assessment on Environmentally Zones land – but there is huge pressure on councillors for this to be allowed.

RFS have indicated that there are 3 major considerations each comes under different legislation:

  1. Safety and Controlling Wildfire is the responsibility of the RFS and the Bushfires Act;
  2. Smoke is the regulatory responsibility of the EPA and CC Council. The person who lights the fire (either with or without a permit) is responsible for any deleterious effects on neighbours;
  3. Environment(vegetation) is the responsibility of the CC Council and clearing or burning needs their approval.

However, RFS are missing a significant aspect, being the impact of pollution on public health. As this policy covers the discretionary burning of a heap of dry vegetation at any time except during days of total fire bans it is not emergency or critical part of the fire risk management strategy. The fuel could just as easily be disposed of by other means which do not generate smoke – such as mulching or dumping at a waste facility. Air Pollution in the Sydney Air Shed can come from anywhere from the Central Coast to the Illawarra as the winds recirculate being trapped between the mountains and the coast.

There are many areas on the Central Coast where blocks of rural residential of 4,000 + square metres could be burnt regularly. For example, In the immediate area surrounding Glenning Valley, (Ourimbah, Berkeley Vale) there are nearly 14,000 people who are likely to be adversely impacted by smoke. Hence, the policy should not apply near urban areas.

Where burning may be conducted without a Permit, there is nothing to stop people burning each time a pile of leaves can be raked up, this could be almost continually. 1 in 9 Australians suffer from asthma and wood smoke is a source which is almost impossible to avoid.

It is not that hard to take vegetation to the tip – just laziness and disregard for the health of others by some landowners.

If you are affected by smoke or live in an area where people like to light up every weekend say NO to more pollution. Put a submission which asks CC Council to always require a Permit for Pile Burning.

CEN has an online form to help with submissions - click here

For more information visit: https://www.yourvoiceourcoast.com/draftopenpileburnpolicy

Remember - submissions are due by 19th December

The Central Coast Council has recently placed its Draft Tree and Vegetation Management Chapter XXX on exhibition for public comment.

While the draft chapter generally requires landowners to obtain a Permit from Council to remove or prune a tree, the draft also describes Exemptions to avoid having to obtain a Council Permit.

The Draft Chapter and Submission details are available through the following link: https://www.yourvoiceourcoast.com/draft-development-control-plan-xx-tree-and-vegetation-management.

Under the proposed chapter, trees may be removed without a Permit if Council is “satisfied” that they are dead or are assessed as posing a risk to persons or property and are not required as habitat for native fauna. Evidence of these assessments is required to be kept by the landowner for 6 months after the removal.

THE COMMUNITY'S CHANCE TO STOP MANGROVE MOUNTAIN LANDFILL

Background information on Mangrove Mountain Landfill

Mangrove Mountain Landfill sits at the highest point of the Central Coast water catchment and threatens the quality of the Central Coast water supply. The Landfill is located at the Mangrove Mountain Golf Course on the boundary between Gosford LGA and Wyong LGA. The threat comes from escaping leachate produced by the landfill that can seep into the underlying groundwater aquifer. This landfill has been getting bigger since 2001 and is currently 10 times the approved size.

The landfill has lain idle since 2014, following action in the Land and Environment Court, although there is still the matter of 800,000 cubic metres of waste sitting there without an effective lining underneath to prevent the escape of toxic leachate into the groundwater.

Scientific study has demonstrated that almost half of the stream flow in Ourimbah Creek comes from this groundwater. Central Coast Council pumps out of Ourimbah Creek into Mardi Dam. Water in Mardi Dam is shared with Mangrove Creek Dam. These are the two potable water storage facilities for the entire Central Coast.

The Mountain Districts community has been engaged for over ten years, opposing this threat to the regional water supply.

Two actions are sought. Firstly, a Special Commission of Inquiry to investigate the reasons that allowed a minor golf course remodelling project with development consent to become a regional waste management facility. Mangrove Mountain Landfill is an example of a gross failure of regulatory process and the community would like an inquiry to identify how this happened so that these sorts of things can be prevented in the future. Secondly, the community believe that Mangrove Mountain Landfill should be closed and the site remediated to eliminate the threat of leachate contaminating the Central Coast drinking water supply.

The shark was found at a popular NSW central coast diving spot

The shark was found at a popular NSW central coast diving spot.

Our oceans are under threat, with warming oceans, pollution and over fishing we need to ensure we establish protected marine environments for future generations.

Shark Drowned in Marine Sanctuary

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-07-29/divers-find-shark-strung-up/4850334

The Shark was caught, stabbed and drowned in a marine sanctuary.

The State Government has released a series of documents.
They are colourful, have lots of photos and drawings.
But the devil is in the detail.
This fact sheet explores the detail.

pdfHere is the detail - download

The State Government is proposing to take away planning controls of Council; allow overshadowing of parks; eliminate planning controls on both the maximum height & FSR on large sites; reduce parking requirements for specific developments and on specific sites.
In other words, the State Government is opening the door to developers where the State Government is both the assessing authority and the determining authority. What check and balance does the community have?

Have your say lodge a submission.

Thoughts for inclusion in a submission

  • Councillor representation should be on all decision making bodies including Design Review Panel. “No taxation without representation”;
  • Council to have responsibility for assessment of all applications no matter what value to ensure effective community consultation is included in the assessment process. “Elected representatives to ensure ratepayers voice is heard”;
  • No overshadowing of any public parks including Kibble, Burns and Leagues Club between 9 am and 3 pm at winter solstice. “A park is not a park without sunlight”;
  • Ridgeline views to be contiguous with from waterfront. “Public Space maintains amenity”;
  • Impact of large buildings on views from lookouts to be assessed and not to be impacting horizon; “Maintain uninterrupted horizon views from public reserves (such as Rumbalara and Presidents Hill)”;
  • Car parking to match most likely demand, not idealised projections or wishful thinking; “Number of car parking spaces based on actual demand”; and
  • Place Manager to be employed by Council.

Submissions can be emailed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
You can post a submission to the
Department of Planning and Environment,
PO Box 1148
Gosford NSW 2250
Submissions close on 29 June, 2018

Mountain Districts Association (MDA) and the Community Environment Network (CEN) are now calling for an Independent Commission of Inquiry and investigation by the NSW Police into the Mangrove Mountain Landfill as a matter of urgencyWe are also calling on the NSW Premier to sack the EPA Board.

Did you see the ABC 4Corners story exposing the waste industry and disaster at Mangrove Mountain Landfill?

There needs to be an investigation into the sordid facts behind Gosford City Council (GCC) and NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA)’s apparent gross neglect of statutory responsibilities.

This landfill site is in our drinking water catchment.We need this waste dump cleaned up and the site rehabilitated.

Mountains Districts Association submitted a lenghty document to the NSW Premier detailing major irregularities in the licensing, operation and management of Mangrove Mountain Landfill over a period of 18 years.

Wildwatch logo small

Our Wildwatch Program is all about connecting kids with nature.

Research over the past decade has built up an impressive body of evidence demonstrating the value of connecting children with nature in a way that results in an increase in environmental knowledge, a deeper, more personal, understanding of the way their world functions, academic gains, and higher social and emotional functioning, especially in self-esteem, calculated risk taking and confidence. (AAEE website)

Wildwatch is an opportunity for children (and families) to engage in a program that promotes a love of nature, opportunities to observe nature and grow in knowledge, skills and understanding.

Litoria chloris3 cropped for email

 

 

Click here to sign up to Wildwatch!

  

 Want to find out more? - then email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

OEH ETlogoThe Wildwatch program is supported by the NSW Government through its Environmental Trust

 

Maitland bay photo resized

As part of our 20th Anniversary Celebrations, CEN will be holding an Amateur Photographic Competition.

Objectives of the Competition: 

To showcase the Environment of the Central Coast. That is, the flora and fauna, native to the region and the beaches, waterways and landforms from the Hawkesbury River in the south to the Hunter River in the north. The western boundary is defined by the McPherson, Olney and Wattagan State Forests.  

Competition Categories:

  • Youth: a person under the age of 18 years
  • Adult: a person over the age of 18 years
  • Monochrome: is defined as any print containing shades of only one colour. If toning is carried out it must be over the whole image.
  • Colour: any photograph which is not monochrome, including monochrome images which have been partially toned or had colour added will be classed as colour prints.
  • Flora: flowers, trees, shrubs native to the Central Coast
  • Fauna: land, sea or air-borne native to the Central Coast (including insects or migratory birds which visit the Central Coast)
  • Waterways, Underwater and Landforms: includes the beaches, creeks, rivers, waterfalls, wetlands, underwater and natural geographical features of the Central Coast.

Entry Fee and payment:

 $8:00 per photograph

Key Dates:
  • Entries are to be received by 4:30 pm on Wednesday 17th May 2017
  • Exhibition Dates: Friday 26th May to Wednesday 31st May 2017 at The Entrance Gallery
  • On Wednesday 31st May 2017 collect from the Gallery between the hours of noon and 3pm

For further details - pdfDownload our Terms and Conditions / Entry Form.

ONLINE ENTRY FORM

For more information - phone Barbara - ph: 4332 3597 or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Wyong and Wyee residents have banded together to oppose the proposed Warnervale Airport.

Make your voice heard - and ensure that the proposal to increase the capacity of Warnervale airport is not carried forward in the Central Coast Regional Plan.

Do not accept Wyong Council’s proposal for a B737 and A320 capable 1800m jet airport with flight paths over your home.

The Central Coast Draft Regional Plan is currently on exhibition - submissions close on 28 February, 2016.

What you can do to help:

Click here to complete an online submission to Department of Planning

Want to find out about some of the good and bad things that are happening with decision makers in relation to the Gosford environment and efforts to achieve environmental sustainability?

Sign up to the Gosford Observer here

Read the latest Gosford Observer

The Coastal Open Space System (COSS) is a network of reserves supporting natural vegetation that are managed by Gosford Council for a number of environmental and community values. COSS lands provide important ecological habitats (or homes) and essential linkages (wildlife corridors) for diverse fauna and flora. These natural areas are also popular places for leisure and relaxation with residents and visitors alike.

Become a Friend of COSS Member

The Community Environment Network (CEN) is proud to offer the services of a professional Bush Regeneration Team. CEN has been conducting professional Bush Regeneration Services for over 6 years.

CEN News Headlines

  • CEN Networking Night and BAT Award Winners

    Last night, 28 November was CEN’s End of Year get-together where we celebrated together the achievements of this past year. We also presented the 2019 Be a Team (BAT) Awards and CEN Staff gave a brief update on their activities for the year. The 2019 winners are: Most outstanding all-rounder “BAT”

    Read More
  • Chair's Update - 'Living Systems'

    The recent catastrophic fire conditions have highlighted the deep disconnect we have with nature and lack of understanding of our interdependency with this living system, of which we are a part. This ignorance at all levels of our complex societies, has detached the connection between deforestation leading to soil erosion

    Read More
  • Rapid Response needed! Submissions on the Draft Biodiversity Strategy

    Please make a submission - they close on Monday, 11 November, 2019.  Central Coast Council has recently exhibited a draft Biodiversity Strategy. We note that there are many good actions in the document that staff have prepared. It is also a well presented document with lots of good information and illustrations.

    Read More
  • Chair's Update - Be Like Nature

    Nature is diverse, connected, interdependent, restorative, and regenerative which has with time generated resilient communities of species and natural wonder. Those of us who do enjoy spending time in our natural environment would recognise this quality about being human, we are aware of nature’s beauty and bounty.

    Read More
  • Chair's Update - Building Youth

    Building our Youth, for the future is something as community members and leaders we should be refocusing our energies. To quote Franklin D. Roosevelt, “We cannot always build a future for our youth, but we can always build our youth for the future.” As a community campaigner over the years

    Read More
  • Chair's Update - Challenging Times

    We face challenging times across the globe with global warming and climate change, these challenges also bring opportunities to develop sustainable development, that is in balance with our basic needs of clean air, water and soil to grow our foods and plant our trees. A balanced approach is needed to

    Read More
  • ABC 4Corners expose of waste industry and Mangrove Mountain landfill - calls for a Commission of Inquiry

    Mountain Districts Association (MDA) and the Community Environment Network (CEN) are now calling for an Independent Commission of Inquiry and investigation by the NSW Police into the Mangrove Mountain Landfill as a matter of urgency. We are also calling on the NSW Premier to sack the EPA Board. Did you see the ABC 4Corners story exposing the waste

    Read More
  • THE BATTLE OVER MANGROVE MOUNTAIN LANDFILL IS IN THE LAND AND ENVIRONMENT COURT

    Background information on Mangrove Mountain Landfill Mangrove Mountain Landfill sits at the highest point of the Central Coast water catchment and threatens the quality of the Central Coast water supply. The Landfill is located at the Mangrove Mountain Golf Course on the boundary between Gosford LGA and Wyong LGA. The

    Read More
  • Wildwatch - Connecting Kids with Nature

    Our Wildwatch Program is all about connecting kids with nature. Research over the past decade has built up an impressive body of evidence demonstrating the value of connecting children with nature in a way that results in an increase in environmental knowledge, a deeper, more personal, understanding of the way

    Read More
  • New Council Pile Burning Policy

    CEN belives that this is a very bad policy that will impact the health of many people with asthma as it allows burning without a permit and increases the amount of fuel by 270%. The existing RFS/NSWFB Policy on Pile Burning does all that is needed for keeping properties clear

    Read More
  • Join the Friends of COSS

    The Coastal Open Space System (COSS) is a network of reserves supporting natural vegetation that are managed by Gosford Council for a number of environmental and community values. COSS lands provide important ecological habitats (or homes) and essential linkages (wildlife corridors) for diverse fauna and flora. These natural areas are

    Read More
  • The Community's chance to save the trees in the back yards of the Central Coast

    The Central Coast Council has recently placed its Draft Tree and Vegetation Management Chapter XXX on exhibition for public comment. While the draft chapter generally requires landowners to obtain a Permit from Council to remove or prune a tree, the draft also describes Exemptions to avoid having to obtain a

    Read More
  • Save our Fish - The Hawkesbury Shelf marine bioregion assessment Plan

    The shark was found at a popular NSW central coast diving spot. Our oceans are under threat, with warming oceans, pollution and over fishing we need to ensure we establish protected marine environments for future generations. Shark Drowned in Marine Sanctuary http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-07-29/divers-find-shark-strung-up/4850334 The Shark was caught, stabbed and drowned in

    Read More
  • What is the Future of Gosford City

    The State Government has released a series of documents.They are colourful, have lots of photos and drawings.But the devil is in the detail.This fact sheet explores the detail. Here is the detail - download The State Government is proposing to take away planning controls of Council; allow overshadowing of parks; eliminate

    Read More
  • CEN 20th Anniversary Amateur Photographic Competition

    As part of our 20th Anniversary Celebrations, CEN will be holding an Amateur Photographic Competition. Objectives of the Competition:  To showcase the Environment of the Central Coast. That is, the flora and fauna, native to the region and the beaches, waterways and landforms from the Hawkesbury River in the south

    Read More
  • Residents Oppose Warnervale Airport proposal

    Wyong and Wyee residents have banded together to oppose the proposed Warnervale Airport. Make your voice heard - and ensure that the proposal to increase the capacity of Warnervale airport is not carried forward in the Central Coast Regional Plan. Do not accept Wyong Council’s proposal for a B737 and A320

    Read More
  • CEN Bush Regen Team Available

    The Community Environment Network (CEN) is proud to offer the services of a professional Bush Regeneration Team. CEN has been conducting professional Bush Regeneration Services for over 6 years.

    Read More
  • Sign up to Gosford Observer

    Want to find out about some of the good and bad things that are happening with decision makers in relation to the Gosford environment and efforts to achieve environmental sustainability? Sign up to the Gosford Observer here Read the latest Gosford Observer

    Read More
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Contact details

CALL 02 4349 4756

FAX 02 4349 4755

PO Box 149 Ourimbah NSW 2258

CEN OFFICES
The Manor, Central Coast Campus
University of Newcaste
Brush Road Ourimbah
NSW

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